Project Management

Goals-Driven Investment in Change by Chris Potts

Being excellent at turning ideas for change into the outcomes we want - and at market-speed - is core to every enterprise’s choices, changes and results. 

Change Portfolios must be goals-driven, dynamic, extroverted and efficient. Traditional portfolios - initiatives-driven, static, and often introspective - are becoming constraints on enterprise performance.  It’s time to innovate, transform, and build on the platform they created.

Digital Ice-breaking by Harvey Neve

I was recently doing a bit of networking, talking about how we're using digital exemplar projects as a key enabler to drive our wider digital business transformation. For those who read my blogs, you’ll know I can’t resist a good analogy and the analogy I always use for this is that the exemplars are like icebreaking vessels; big, highly visible, strong and powerful.

Project Managers as Connectors by Jardena London

Connections are a common point of failure in organizations.  In response, most companies create roles for people to manage those connections and ensure that things don’t “fall through the cracks.”   The project manager is a popular role that serves this function.

Traditionally, project managers ensure that things don’t fall between the cracks by coordinating and tracking each and every connection.  The project manager makes sure the gears line up and mesh properly. In an increasingly complex world, this has become a herculean task.

Can continuous improvement be successful?

For businesses today, the requirement to be able to change is integral. Continuous Improvement (CI) can be a means of ensuring your organisation is keeping up-to-date with the world around them. Although the challenges are numerous, CI can be successful if organisations consider the following 4 recommendations:

Obstacle

Recommendation

What is Continuous Improvement and why businesses need it?

To remain competitive in the modern era, staying still and simply functioning is practically prehistoric. Businesses must be efficient and ahead of the curve, which can be done in a number of ways, one of which is through implementing a culture of Continuous Improvement (CI). Firms are competitive, not by their product/service, location or process, but by what it knows about how it behaves in various situations and understanding how to improve the efficiency of this behaviour. CI provides this knowledge and allows an organisation to constantly act on this knowledge.

Some useful steps to follow when hiring a coach for your business by Kirsty Brooks

Choosing the right coach can be a minefield, following some simple steps can help to make sure you get it right.

Whether you are looking for a coach for your organisation or for you personally, there are a few things that you can do to make sure you hire the right coach. If the answer is 'no' to the following questions, read on:

Cyber Security People – A Diverse Bunch of Behaviours! by Indy Dhami

Over the past 15 years of working in the cybersecurity industry I have been privileged to have worked with highly intelligent, experienced and articulate colleagues. My experiences in large scale transformation programmes, workshops, interviews, managing both project and operational teams encompass consulting and internal business roles. These experiences led to interactions with hundreds of individuals where I have become aware of some consistent and humorous behaviour types displayed. These include eight positive and negative types including:

How Employee Feedback and a Culture of Honesty Can Improve Your Projects by Shea Heaver

All too frequently we think of projects in terms of schedules, requirements, budgets, resources and the like. We plan meticulously for them and hold onto the axiom that failing to plan is simply planning to fail. But how many of us actually plan for the human side of a project – the social, emotional and responsive elements of a project?

Let’s face it, we’ve all been in situations where (despite meticulous planning) we hear or say something along the lines of “Hmm! That’s not what I was expecting”, “Oh! I thought you meant this” or “Sorry! I wasn’t aware of that”.

Process Side of Change Management by Ramkumar Viswanathan

People, Process and Technology are three pillars of change management. In this blog, I am going to look at the process side of change management. Although Process has a considerable overlap with other two aspects, there is still room to look at process in isolation. Borrowing from the simple yet effective model of Lewin, Process can be unfreezed, analysed and repackaged as shown in the below diagram.


Figure 1: Transforming Cube to Cone