Employee Engagement

Recognitions Are About the Why (Not Who)

Sevenstep is always so pleased to be recognized along with other great providers and leaders within the industry. Awards like HRO Today’s “Baker’s Dozen” and “HR Superstars” lists as well as Talent Board’s “CandE’s” do a great job of bringing success stories in talent outsourcing to the surface for the benefit of all consumers of these services.

What Employees Really Want to Experience at Work

The best thing that can happen to people at work is to experience flow.

Flow at work happens when you are completely involved in what you are doing.
When you’re in a state of flow, you know what needs to be done and how well you are doing. You have the skills and tools to get the job done and you are able to thoroughly focus. Needless to say, flow results in higher employee engagement and productivity.

Time Out - It's Not Me First, It's Me Too! by Kelly Swingler

Putting our people first is vital for their wellbeing, and aside from the fact that it makes good business sense, it's the right thing to do. With stress, burnout, mental health issues, health problems, debt, and addiction on the increase, a stressful workplace or toxic workplace culture can play a huge role in the mental, emotional and physical health of our people.

Why Employee Engagement Is Important for Any Business

You’ve probably heard of employee satisfaction and employee engagement, but what’s the difference? A satisfied employee is happy with their job, but an engaged employee feels invested in the organization, is motivated to perform at their best, and goes above and beyond to contribute to the organization’s goals.

Here are four ways employee engagement translates to business success. 

I don't want to be a killjoy, but ... by Andrew Fox

The graph above, too small to read, shows productivity in the OECD 2007 using GDP per hour worked.  Source OECD StatExtracts.  It shows we in the UK are 11th.

Wikipedia says labour productivity, is used by many as an indicator of economic growth and competitiveness.

The HBR says, “At its most basic, productivity is the amount of value produced divided by the amount of cost (or time) required to do so.”