digital transformation

Digital Ice-breaking by Harvey Neve

I was recently doing a bit of networking, talking about how we're using digital exemplar projects as a key enabler to drive our wider digital business transformation. For those who read my blogs, you’ll know I can’t resist a good analogy and the analogy I always use for this is that the exemplars are like icebreaking vessels; big, highly visible, strong and powerful.

Cybersecurity is becoming a matter of good corporate governance, good ethics, and quite simply – good business by Jean-Christophe Gaillard

Cybersecurity has risen as a key issue on the radar of virtually all organisations. As a recent AT Kearney report suggests, cyber-attacks have been topping executives’ lists of business risks for three straight years. In fact, the overwhelming majority of organisations have experienced some form of cyber-attack at some point over the past few years.

Leading in an agile world by Harvey Neve

Over the last few years you can’t have failed to notice a number of factors coming together in a potent mix, creating the opportunity for “digital transformation”:

  • availability of data,
  • the power and availability of technology,
  • mobile and cloud computing,
  • peoples’ raised service expectations,
  • a shift to more agile ways of working.

I’ve observed that this disruption is also driving an absolute requirement for a change in the way leaders lead. Some approaches are simply no longer an option. 

Can Blockchain Really Work for Health and Care? by Gareth Baxendale

In 1837, Hans Christian Andersen wrote the short story called ‘The emperor’s new clothes’ a tale about two weavers who create a beautiful new suit of clothes that they say are invisible to those who are unfit for their positions, stupid, or incompetent – while in reality, they make no clothes at all, making everyone believe the clothes are simply invisible to them. When the emperor parades before the people in his new suit of clothes, no one dares to say that they do not see any clothes on him for fear that they will be seen as stupid.

Implementing new technology in an organisation

Today’s business environment embodies the phrase “survival of the fittest.” As in, if your organisation isn’t as productive and efficient as it can be, you’ll be left behind.

Introducing new technology in today’s digital world can help you remain competitive.

That’s not all though, the effectiveness of your solution depends on how you choose to implement it. If your employees don’t use the new tool, you won’t realise any of its benefits.

Fret not, with careful preparation, effective support, and defined end-goals, you can make your technology roll-out a success.

User Experience Design - a key to Digital Transformation by Sandeep Raut

Well, this statement is true for Disney, Nestle, Apple, Amazon and other leaders as they focused mostly on the customer/user experience.

Digital Transformation is in almost every c-level magazine, blog and whitepaper, and executives do not want someone coming in and disrupting their business.

If you want to reap the rewards of the digital revolution, a smooth, easy and positive user experience is vital.

Large Firms: What role for the Group CISO? by Jean-Christophe Gaillard

The same title often hides a large diversity of roles, positioned differently across their respective organisations. It often reflects the maturity of each firm towards the appreciation of the threats it faces, the need for business protection, and its appetite for controls.

For large groups, in particular where business units or geographies manage their own bottom line and have a significant degree of autonomy in real terms, it can result in a large population of security practitioners across the group with very diverse approaches, objectives and priorities.

Digital Transformation; a load of old horse? by Harvey Neve

Many years ago, as a young brewery sales manager, I was talking to the new transport manager who'd recently taken over from someone who’d “been there years.” Now that he was settled in he was starting to have a look at things and one of the things he wondered about was the seemingly erratic delivery route planning; On a Monday the dray lorries would go out to customers on the very extremities of the delivery area and the next day they were all within a stone’s throw of the brewery. Wednesday they were moderately far away, the following day round the doors again and on a Friday right out at