change management

Not just another Brick in the Wall by Ron Leeman

I would imagine that the majority of us when we were kids had a Lego set bought for us and of course, Lego is still around today … what a great success story. The kind of Lego sets that you probably had bought for you normally consisted of specific bricks and pieces + a set of instructions that showed you how to build whatever it was on the box. Great so away you went opening the box and tipping out all the individual pieces onto the table or floor or whatever.

Digital Transformation - is Change Management the key to success? by Ron Leeman

Before we start as always let me give you a few definitions of "Digital Transformation":

I like the last one but then again I would because I'm biased

So I started my usual journey of discovery and back onto my trusted Google I went using the search string “digital transformation” … guess what … 302,000,000 hits … aaaaaarrrrrggggghhhhhhhhh!

However, one initial thing I found of interest was this:

Project Managers as Connectors by Jardena London

Connections are a common point of failure in organizations.  In response, most companies create roles for people to manage those connections and ensure that things don’t “fall through the cracks.”   The project manager is a popular role that serves this function.

Traditionally, project managers ensure that things don’t fall between the cracks by coordinating and tracking each and every connection.  The project manager makes sure the gears line up and mesh properly. In an increasingly complex world, this has become a herculean task.

Security and Agile Delivery at an Enterprise Level by Dave Keenan

In many of the places that I have worked, both as a consultant and as a part of a product delivery team, it is usually a case of keeping the Enterprise Information Security team (EIS) at arm’s length. Truth be told, many teams hold to the old adage that the less EIS get involved, the better. Even more so with agile delivery, as the focus towards shorter, more targeted delivery means that EIS is a thorn in product delivery’s side. And though this article leans towards agile delivery, the points made are equally applicable to any waterfall delivery.

Saying goodbye. Why is organisational change so tough for people? by Jonny McCormick

As a young adult I had the opportunity to work at a camp in Canada for 4 summers. It’s amazing how quickly you build relationships and bonds with people over a 12–16 week period.

Spending nights around the campfire together, playing stupid games, swimming in the lake, mooching around the local towns and enjoying the stars in the nightsky. It’s a full on experience and it’s easy to see how some of the people have become some of my closest friends.

Procurement's Technological Insanity — The reality of change (Part 4/4) by Bertrand Maltaverne

This last post on the series on the adoption of Procurement technology will highlight what actually happens during a change.

It is only with a good understanding of these aspects that change leaders can conduct fruitful and lasting change initiatives.


The Kübler-Ross change curve…

A classic representation of a person’s reaction to change is the Elisabeth Kübler-Ross change curve. It describes the emotional phases people go through when they lose someone:

Enterprise Agile Transformations – Why They’re a Marathon, Not a Sprint by Vikram Jain

Many organisations embarking on an enterprise-wide transformation to agile working, struggle to sustain or scale the benefits they initially achieve. The journey towards agility is a marathon, not a sprint, and it requires continued commitment, at all levels of the organisation, to ensure agile ways of working stick.

The first six to 12 months of introducing agile throughout an organisation will result in visible improvements in speed to market, productivity, efficiency and employee engagement.  

Beware of the blob by Alex Butler

‘Well,' I said. ‘Eventually, the blob will get you. It’s important to run as fast as you can in the early days of your transformation, because organisations have an in-built protection mechanism; the ability to morph into a blob of slime that will eventually catch up with you, surround you in slime and kill you off’.